Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology
Home About us Instructions Submission Subscribe Advertise Contact Login    Print this page  Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size 
Users Online: 840 


 
Table of Contents   
IMAGE QUIZ  
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 149-150
Massive diffuse intraperitoneal multicystic mass in an infant


Department of Pediatric Surgery, CSMMU (Erstwhile King George's Medical University), Lucknow, India

Click here for correspondence address and email

Date of Web Publication14-Mar-2012
 

How to cite this article:
Singh S, Kureel SN, Chandra N. Massive diffuse intraperitoneal multicystic mass in an infant. Saudi J Gastroenterol 2012;18:149-50

How to cite this URL:
Singh S, Kureel SN, Chandra N. Massive diffuse intraperitoneal multicystic mass in an infant. Saudi J Gastroenterol [serial online] 2012 [cited 2019 Nov 12];18:149-50. Available from: http://www.saudijgastro.com/text.asp?2012/18/2/149/93826


An 18-month-old boy was referred for painless progressively increasing abdominal distension, poor oral intake, and lethargy since 1 year. There was no history of fever, hematurea, or intestinal obstruction. The child was pale and had a pulse rate of 150 beats/min. The child had mild respiratory distress due to huge abdominal distension. The abdomen was tense and nontender. There was no evidence of intraperitoneal free fluid or any definitive lump. The hemogram showed anemia, other blood biochemistry test results were normal. Ultrasonography of the abdomen suggested the possibility of encysted ascites. A 64-slice contrast-enhanced computed tomography of abdomen showed diffuse intraperitoneal multicystic mass, composed of variable sizes and wall thickness cysts [Figure 1]. The definitive organ of origin could not be identified. Bowel loops were displaced upward by the mass. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed a pale, soft, extremely friable mass composed of cysts of variable sizes arising from the dome of the bladder. The cysts were noncommunicating and had no fluid. The mass was loosely adhered to the bowel, liver, and peritoneum. The rest of the abdominal organs were normal. Complementary cystoscopy was performed to rule out intraluminal extension of tumor, which was normal.
Figure 1: A 64-slice contrast-enhanced computed tomography of abdomen (a) Coronal view demonstrating a multicystic mass with no fluid within the cysts occupying whole of the abdominal cavity and displacing bowels upward; (b) Bladder outline with both ureters are evident on posterior sections; and (c) Axial view suggesting a multicystic mass composed of cysts of variable sizes and wall thickness

Click here to view



   Question Top


Q1. What is the diagnosis?



Click here to view answer. View Answer


 
   References Top

1.Al-Shedoukhy A, Qayyum A. Urinary bladder botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma with immature cartilage in a 24-year-old male patient: A case report. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2003;14:522-5.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
2.Mostofi FK, Morse WH. Polypoid rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) of bladder in children. J Urol 1952;67:681-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Uzüm N, Ozçay N, Ataoðlu O. Benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma. Turk J Gastroenterol 2009;20:138-41.  Back to cited text no. 3
    

Top
Correspondence Address:
Sunita Singh
Department of Pediatric Surgery, CSMMU (Erstwhile King George's Medical University), Lucknow - 226 003
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1319-3767.93826

Rights and Permissions


    Figures

  [Figure 1]



 

Top
  
 
  Search
 
  
  
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


   Question
   Answer
    References
    Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1428    
    Printed69    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded239    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal