Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology
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Year : 2012  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 392-393
A mysterious cause of stool ova


1 Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Patras 26504, Greece
2 Department of Internal Medicine; Division of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Patras, Patras 26504, Greece
3 Department of Internal Medicine; Division of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Patras, Patras 26504, Greece

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Date of Web Publication10-Nov-2012
 

How to cite this article:
Assimakopoulos SF, Thomopoulos K, Marangos M. A mysterious cause of stool ova. Saudi J Gastroenterol 2012;18:392-3

How to cite this URL:
Assimakopoulos SF, Thomopoulos K, Marangos M. A mysterious cause of stool ova. Saudi J Gastroenterol [serial online] 2012 [cited 2020 Jan 25];18:392-3. Available from: http://www.saudijgastro.com/text.asp?2012/18/6/392/103433


A 50-year-old woman presented for colonoscopy for investigation of diarrhea over the last 2 months with repeated observation of stool eggs. The patient reported no travel abroad, no close animal contact, consumption of raw food or untreated water, weight loss, fever, or perianal itching. Her past medical history was notable of generalized anxiety disorder with comorbid depression and irritable bowel syndrome and was currently treated with venlafaxine 150 mg once daily. Three separate stool tests for ova and parasites had been negative, blood exams showed no leukocytosis or eosinophilia and biochemical profile was also normal. The patient had been previously empirically prescribed albendazole, niclosamide, and praziquantel consecutively without clear up effect. Upon referral to our department, despite her good physical condition, she was obviously emotionally stressed and especially worried about her medical problem. Lower endoscopy revealed a normal colonic mucosa with intraluminal presence of numerous eggs of about 1 mm diameter [Figure 1].
Figure 1: Endoscopic view of the colon: Intraluminal presence of numerous spherical white "eggs" of about 1 mm diameter and normal colonic mucosa

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   Question Top


What is the diagnosis for patient's stool eggs?



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   References Top

1.Muller R, Baker JR. Medical Parasitology. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company; 1990.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Ash LR, Orihel TC. Atlas of Human Parasitology. 4 th ed. Chicago: ASCP Press; 1997.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Winters R, Winn W Jr. Macroscopic mimics of helminths in stool specimen examination. Lab Med 2008;39:114-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
    

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Correspondence Address:
Stelios F Assimakopoulos
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Patras - 26504
Greece
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1319-3767.103433

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This article has been cited by
1 Eiholm, S.
Ikke alle kosttilskud er biologisk nedbrydelige
Ugeskrift for Laeger. 2013; 175(49): 3028-3029
[Pubmed]



 

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