Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 177-182

Risk factors of in-hospital mortality among patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and acute myocardial infarction


1 Department of Gastroenterology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Clinical Research Center for Digestive Disease, Beijing Digestive Disease Center, Beijing Key Laboratory for Precancerous Lesion of Digestive Disease, Beijing, China
2 Department of Cardiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Institute of Heart Lung and Blood Vessel Disease, The Key Laboratory of Remodeling-related Cardiovascular Disease, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Shutian Zhang
Department of Gastroenterology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Clinical Research Center for Digestive Disease, Beijing Digestive Disease Center, Beijing Key Laboratory for Precancerous Lesion of Digestive Disease, Beijing - 100050
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sjg.SJG_492_17

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Background/Aims: Patients with simultaneous upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have higher mortality than patients with either GIB or AMI. We aimed to assess the incidence and risk factors of in-hospital mortality in patients with UGIB and AMI. Patients and Methods: A total of 243 patients with UGIB and AMI were enrolled during 2012–2017. Clinical and laboratory data were collected and analyzed for clinical characteristics and potential risk factors of in-hospital mortality. Results: Among the 243 patients, 60 in-hospital deaths were observed (in-hospital mortality rate of 24.7%). Patients who died were older than the survivors (78.7 ± 6.6 vs. 72.6 ± 10.5 years, P < 0.001). Compared with survivors, patients who died showed increased peak white blood cell (WBC) count (9.74 ± 4.72 vs. 7.60 ± 2.91 × 109/L, P= 0.002), serum creatinine levels [134 (106, 190) vs. 97 (79, 125) mmol/L, P= 0.014], peak blood urine nitrogen levels (16.31 ± 8.48 mmol/L vs. 9.86 ± 6.33 mmol/L, P < 0.001), and peak brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) amounts [13,250 (6071, 30,000) vs. 3598 (728, 12,842) pg/mL, P < 0.001]. Meanwhile, patients who died also displayed lower minimum hemoglobin levels (78.3 ± 21.1 vs. 86.3 ± 22.3 g/L, P= 0.018) and minimum platelet counts (184.3 ± 79.1 vs. 214.6 ± 80.1 × 109/L, P= 0.013). In multivariable logistic analysis, age [OR (95% CI) =1.118 (1.053–1.186), P < 0.001], peak WBC count [OR (95% CI) =1.252 (1.113–1.407), P < 0.001], minimum platelet count [OR (95% CI) = 0.994 (0.989–1.000), P= 0.032], and peak BNP levels [OR (95% CI) =3.880 (1.761–8.550), P= 0.001] were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Conclusions: Patients with UGIB and AMI had a high in-hospital mortality, which was independently associated with age, peak WBC count, minimum platelet count, and peak BNP levels.


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