Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2012  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 208--213

Perinatal cytomegalovirus hepatitis in Saudi infants: A case series


Mohammed Y Hasosah1, Suzane Y Kutbi2, Abdulfattah W Al-Amri3, Ashraf F Alsahafi1, Ghassan A Sukkar1, Khaled J Alghamdi1, Kevan Jacobson4 
1 Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences/National Guard Health Affairs, Western Region, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Pediatric Infection, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences/National Guard Health Affairs, Western Region, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Microbiology, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences/National Guard Health Affairs, Western Region, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, British Colombia Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Mohammed Y Hasosah
King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences/National Guard Health Affairs, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, PO Box: 8202, Jeddah 21482
Saudi Arabia

Background/Aim: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common congenital viral infection, occurring in 0.4%-2.3% of all live births. The clinical manifestations of CMV are multiorgan involvement. Currently, the numbers of studies of hepatic CMV infection in immunocompetent infants are insufficient and little information exists in the medical literature about the hepatic manifestations and complications of CMV. Patients and Methods: Nine infants diagnosed with hepatic CMV infection were included in the study. The diagnosis was based on the presence of IgM anti-CMV antibodies titer in serum and detection of CMV-DNA in blood. The authors identified clinical characteristics, biochemical characteristics, immunologic markers, and the outcome of hepatic CMV with or without treatment. Results: Jaundice was the most common clinical feature of CMV infection in infancy (100%). Hepatic abnormalities in the form of cholestasis (defined as a serum conjugated bilirubin concentration greater than 17.1 μmol/L or greater than 20% of the total serum bilirubin) were found in all patients (100%), hepatitis (77%), hypoalbuminemia (55%), elevated alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase (77%). Other findings showed hepatosplenomegaly (44%), thrombocytopenia (22%) and low birth weight (11%) The treatment of hepatic CMV infection was indicated in 66% and was not indicated in 33%. Both of them had resolved cholestasis and hepatitis. Conclusion: Jaundice and cholestasis were the most common clinical features of hepatic CMV infections. Hepatic CMV infection in young infants is often a self-limited illness that does not require antiviral therapy. Most of the patients with hepatic CMV infection had a favorable outcome.


How to cite this article:
Hasosah MY, Kutbi SY, Al-Amri AW, Alsahafi AF, Sukkar GA, Alghamdi KJ, Jacobson K. Perinatal cytomegalovirus hepatitis in Saudi infants: A case series.Saudi J Gastroenterol 2012;18:208-213


How to cite this URL:
Hasosah MY, Kutbi SY, Al-Amri AW, Alsahafi AF, Sukkar GA, Alghamdi KJ, Jacobson K. Perinatal cytomegalovirus hepatitis in Saudi infants: A case series. Saudi J Gastroenterol [serial online] 2012 [cited 2020 Aug 6 ];18:208-213
Available from: http://www.saudijgastro.com/article.asp?issn=1319-3767;year=2012;volume=18;issue=3;spage=208;epage=213;aulast=Hasosah;type=0