Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 323-

Swallow syncope and high-resolution esophageal manometry


Levent Filik 
 Department of Gastroenterology Clinic, Ankara Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Levent Filik
Department of Gastroenterology Clinic, Ankara Research Hospital, Ankara
Turkey




How to cite this article:
Filik L. Swallow syncope and high-resolution esophageal manometry.Saudi J Gastroenterol 2014;20:323-323


How to cite this URL:
Filik L. Swallow syncope and high-resolution esophageal manometry. Saudi J Gastroenterol [serial online] 2014 [cited 2019 Oct 18 ];20:323-323
Available from: http://www.saudijgastro.com/text.asp?2014/20/5/323/141697


Full Text

Sir,

I read with great interest the recent case study by Garg et al. on swallow syncope. [1] I really appreciate the authors for this important study and excellent outcomes of three different clinical pictures of patients with swallow syncope. In the present article, the authors postulated that esophageal disorders might alter sensory pathways from the esophagus to central nervous system leading to syncope. The authors postulated that esophageal disorders might alter sensory pathways from the esophagus to central nervous system leading to syncope. The issue of concern here is that the place of high-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) to define the changes in harmony of esophageal function and vagal activity in those patients. Syncope and vagal response might be linked to changes in fundus or lower esophageal pressure (LES) or LES shortening or esophageal lengthening. [2] That is why HRM should be considered to explain the role of esophageal activity on central nervous system leading to syncope and help in determination of further diagnostic workup.

References

1Garg S, Girotra M, Glasser S, Dutta SK. Swallow syncope: Clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria, and therapeutic options. Saudi J Gastroenterol 2014;20:207-11.
2Schaub N1, Ng K, Kuo P, Aziz Q, Sifrim D. Gastric and lower esophageal sphincter pressures during nausea: A study using visual motion-induced nausea and high-resolution manometry. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2014;306:G741-7.