Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology
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Year : 2013  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 144-151

The role of endocannabinoids system in fatty liver disease and therapeutic potentials


Department of Medicine, Liver Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Khalid A Alswat
Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Liver Disease Research Center, King Saud University, P.O. Box 7805, Riyadh 11472
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1319-3767.114505

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Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of liver morbidity and mortality with no proven effective therapy as of yet. Its prevalence is increasing globally in parallel with obesity and metabolic syndrome pandemic. The endocannabinoid (EC) system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including fatty liver diseases. This system refers to the cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1) and type 2 (CB2), with both their endogenous ligands and machinery dedicated to EC synthesis and degradation. There is accumulating evidence on the role CB1 as a key mediator of insulin resistance and liver lipogenesis in both animals and humans. On the other hand, CB2 receptors have been shown to promote inflammation with anti-fibrogenic properties. The pharmacological modulation of the EC system activity for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are promising yet premature. The initial limited success due to deleterious central nervous system side-effects are likely to be bypassed with the use of peripherally restricted drugs.


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