Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology
Home About us Instructions Submission Subscribe Advertise Contact Login    Print this page  Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size 
Users Online: 397 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 50-56

Healing acceleration of acetic acid-induced colitis by marigold (Calendula officinalis) in male rats


1 Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz; Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2 Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
3 Gastroenterohepatology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
4 Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
5 Laboratory Animals Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
6 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
7 Young Researchers and Elite Club, Yasuj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Yasuj, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Seyedeh-Leili Asadi-Yousefabad
Young Researchers and Elite Club, Yasuj Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 75917-34715, Yasuj
Iran
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest that would prejudice the impartiality of this scientific work.


DOI: 10.4103/1319-3767.173759

Rights and Permissions

Background/Aim: Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with unknown etiology. Several therapeutic strategies such as consumption of medicinal plants have been used for its treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing effects of Calendula officinalis hydroalcoholic extract in experimentally induced UC in rat. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six rats, weighing 200 ± 20 g, were randomly divided into eight equal groups. UC induced by 3% acetic acid and oral doses of C. officinalis extract, 1500 and 3000 mg/kg, and enema (gel 10% and 20%) were given. Two groups as positive controls were given asacol (enema) and oral mesalamine. Negative control groups were given normal saline and base gel. On days 3 and 7, intestinal histopathology and weight changes, plus oxidative stress indices including malondialdehyde (MDA) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed. Results: A significant increase in the body weight of rats was seen in the group given C. officinalis extract 3000 mg/kg orally, oral mesalamine, and 20% intracolonic gel form of marigold extract compared with negative control and base gel groups during the experimental period. Acute inflammation and granular atrophy after UC induction were resolved completely completely by both 20% intracolonic gel and 3000 mg/kg orally. An increase in MPO activity and a decrease in MDA level in response to oral and intracolonic gel form of C. officinalis were observed 3 and and 7 days after treatment (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our results indicate that oral and enema forms of hydroalcoholic extract of C. officinalis can be offered as are potential therapeutic agents for UC induced in rats.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3300    
    Printed48    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded499    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal